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Quoting Poetry in English Papers - English Department

"Not winds, as so commonly printed.
'' 'Wind' has a more poetical connotation, for it suggests a long slowly-moving line of cattle rather than a closely packed herd.'' Phelps.
Add that of Gray's cattle some are returning from the pasture, but others from the plough. Of the innumerable passages that might be quoted in illustration of this line, perhaps that given by Mitford from Petrarch [Pte I. Canzone IV.] is nearest to Gray's picture:

''Veggio, la sera, i buoi tornare sciolti
Dalle campagne e da' solcati colli;''
which, again, is very like Milton's
''what time the labour'd ox
In his loose traces from the furrow came.'' Comus, 291, 2.
Cf. also Homer, Odyssey, IX. 58: [Greek line (omitted)] (when the sun was passing over toward the hour of loosing the oxen).
And Horace's
''Sol ubi montium
mutaret umbras, et juga demeret
bobus fatigatis... '' (Odes, III. 6. 42.)
(what time the sun shifted the shadows of the hills and took the yoke from off the laboured oxen).
A scholar-poet could scarcely mention the 'lowing herd' and the 'plowman' without some reminiscence of this old-world note of time.
Cf. also, after Phelps, Ambrose Philips, Pastoral II. ad fin. ''And unyoked heifers, pacing homeward, low.'' "

If your quotation consists of four or more lines or prose or poetry, follow the guidelines below:

"At this point Eton has:

For Thee, who mindful &c: as above.

If chance that e'er some pensive Spirit more,
By sympathetic Musings here delay'd,
With vain, tho' kind, Enquiry shall explore
Thy once-loved Haunt, this long-deserted Shade.
The first of these lines refers back to the second of the rejected stanzas (see n). These two repetitive stanzas, which G[ray]. was to compress into one, are close to T. Warton, Pleasures of Melancholy 17-21, where Contemplation is invoked as follows: 'O lead me, queen sublime, to solemn glooms / Congenial with my soul; to cheerless shades, / To ruin's seats, to twilight cells and bow'rs, / Where thoughtful melancholy loves to muse, / Her fav'rite midnight haunts.'"

Quoting poetry in your writing is a bit trickier ..

21 Apr 2010 Writing about poetry can be one of the most demanding tasks that many When you are assigned an analytical essay about a poem in an

" ''Much as I admire Gray, one feels I think, in reading his poetry never quite secure against the false poetical style of the eighteenth century. It is always near at hand, sometimes it breaks in; and the sense of this prevents the security one enjoys with truly classic work...

'Thy joys no glittering female meets---'
[Ode on Spring .]
or even things in the Elegy:
'He gave to misery all he had - a tear;
He gain'd from Heaven ('twas all he wish'd) a friend---'
are instances of the sort of drawback I mean.'' Matthew Arnold.
What Arnold notes is the affected antithesis and consequent exaggeration in 'all he had' and ''twas all he wished.' Add the straining after point. If his bounty was large, how comes it, the average reader asks, that he has only a tear to give to misery? If Heaven gave a large recompense, how came it that it gave him only one friend? The answer is that 'a tear' is 'large bounty,' and that 'a friend' is 'a large recompense.' And the retort is that, if this is the point, it is badly made and is not worth making.
We ought not, perhaps, to seek too close a correspondence between the poet's circumstances and the epitaph. It is a coincidence which we must not press, that he was temporarily inconvenienced during the time when he was fitfully engaged upon the second half of the Eleqy by the loss of a house (insured) in Cornhill; at no time in his life was he really embarrassed. During the same period also he had more than one true friend besides Wharton. One cannot however help suspecting either that this epitaph was the one part of the Elegy written in 1742, although undoubtedly not entered in the oldest extant MS. until the completion of the Poem, or that it is retrospective, and recalls the regrets of that melancholy year, when West was dead and Gray, then really solitary, may have longed to be with him (see Odes and Introductory notes). Both here and in the the 'personal note' with which a very general theme is made to end is distinctly not effective. Whether consciously or not, Gray in this imitates West, whose 'Muse as yet unheeded and unknown' winds up 'the monody on the Death of Queen Caroline' with a self-reference, the feebleness of which Gray would have recognised in the case of any other friend [footnote: See Gray and His Friends, pp. 14, 114.]."

" ''Much as I admire Gray, one feels I think, in reading his poetry never quite secure against the false poetical style of the eighteenth century. It is always near at hand, sometimes it breaks in; and the sense of this prevents the security one enjoys with truly classic work...

'Thy joys no glittering female meets---'
[Ode on Spring .]
or even things in the Elegy:
'He gave to misery all he had - a tear;
He gain'd from Heaven ('twas all he wish'd) a friend---'
are instances of the sort of drawback I mean.'' Matthew Arnold.
What Arnold notes is the affected antithesis and consequent exaggeration in 'all he had' and ''twas all he wished.' Add the straining after point. If his bounty was large, how comes it, the average reader asks, that he has only a tear to give to misery? If Heaven gave a large recompense, how came it that it gave him only one friend? The answer is that 'a tear' is 'large bounty,' and that 'a friend' is 'a large recompense.' And the retort is that, if this is the point, it is badly made and is not worth making.
We ought not, perhaps, to seek too close a correspondence between the poet's circumstances and the epitaph. It is a coincidence which we must not press, that he was temporarily inconvenienced during the time when he was fitfully engaged upon the second half of the Eleqy by the loss of a house (insured) in Cornhill; at no time in his life was he really embarrassed. During the same period also he had more than one true friend besides Wharton. One cannot however help suspecting either that this epitaph was the one part of the Elegy written in 1742, although undoubtedly not entered in the oldest extant MS. until the completion of the Poem, or that it is retrospective, and recalls the regrets of that melancholy year, when West was dead and Gray, then really solitary, may have longed to be with him (see Odes and Introductory notes). Both here and in the the 'personal note' with which a very general theme is made to end is distinctly not effective. Whether consciously or not, Gray in this imitates West, whose 'Muse as yet unheeded and unknown' winds up 'the monody on the Death of Queen Caroline' with a self-reference, the feebleness of which Gray would have recognised in the case of any other friend [footnote: See Gray and His Friends, pp. 14, 114.]."

Quoting Poetry in English Papers;

If you are quoting under four lines of poetry, indicate the line breaks with

"At this point Eton has:

For Thee, who mindful &c: as above.

If chance that e'er some pensive Spirit more,
By sympathetic Musings here delay'd,
With vain, tho' kind, Enquiry shall explore
Thy once-loved Haunt, this long-deserted Shade.
The first of these lines refers back to the second of the rejected stanzas (see n). These two repetitive stanzas, which G[ray]. was to compress into one, are close to T. Warton, Pleasures of Melancholy 17-21, where Contemplation is invoked as follows: 'O lead me, queen sublime, to solemn glooms / Congenial with my soul; to cheerless shades, / To ruin's seats, to twilight cells and bow'rs, / Where thoughtful melancholy loves to muse, / Her fav'rite midnight haunts.'"

"Gray himself quotes here in illustration:

''Ch'i veggio nel pensier, dolce mio fuoco,
Fredda una lingua, e due begli occhi chiusi
Rimaner dopo noi pien di faville.''
Petrarch, Son. CLXIX. CLI.
He had already, I believe, made the translation of this sonnet, which is preserved among his Latin poems; perhaps even the turn which he has given to it in the lines
''Nos duo cumque erimus parvus uterque cinis,''
and
''Ardebitque urna multa favilla mea,''
may have set him on embodying in this place of the Elegy the passage quoted. Petrarch's words serve Gray's purpose best if severed from their context. In this sonnet the poet plays with the image of flame. He is burning; all believe this, save her whom alone he wishes to believe it; his ardour, of which she makes no account, and the glory he has given her in his rhyme, may yet inflame a thousand others:
''For in my thought I see, - sweet fire of mine!---
A tongue though chilled, and two fair eyes, though sealed,
Fraught with immortal sparks, survive us still.''
Mitford quotes Chaucer, Cant. Tales, Reeve's prologue (3880):
''Yet in our ashen cold is fire yreken.''
But the Reeve is speaking of the passions of youth surviving in old age."

When you quote consecutive lines of poetry (lines that follow each other ..
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wiki How to Quote and Cite a Poem in an Essay Using MLA Format

"Mitford cites Milton, Comus, 22:

''That like to rich and various gems inlay
The unadorned bosom of the deep;''
but, very inappositely, since the 'sea-girt isles' to which the simile refers are conspicuous and on the surface, whilst it is of the essence of Gray's thought that the gems are invisible and at the bottom. Milton's thought is in fact Shakespeare's (Rich. II. II. 1. 46):
''This precious stone, set in the silver sea.''
The quotation from Bishop Hall's Contemplations, vi. 872, is better: ''There is many a rich stone laid up in the bowells of the earth, many a fair pearle in the bosome of the sea, that never was seene nor never shall bee.'' Noteworthy perhaps as a coincidence is the line Mitford quotes from the Greek of an Italian poet (I think), of the Renaissance:
[Greek line (omitted)]
[Many a pearl far under the waves lies hidden of Ocean.]"

Quoting multiple lines of poetry ..

"Many parallels have been cited for this passage. Perhaps the closest (if Gray had read it, and the concept and phrasing are not unusual) is the one by Celio Magno (1536-1602) cited in O. Shepard and P. S. Woods, eds., English Prose and Poetry, 1660-1800 (Boston, 1934), pp. 1007-8:

Ma (qual in parte ignota
Ben ricca gemma altrui cela il suo pregio,
O fior, ch' alta virtu ha in se riposta
Visse in sen di castita nascosta,)
In sua virtute e 'n Dio contento visse,
Lunge dal visco mondan, che l' alma intrica.
[But (as in an unknown place
A very rich gem conceals its value from its neighbour,
Or a flower, which has great virtue reposed in it,
Has lived hidden in the bosom of chastity,)
He lived content in his virtue and in God
Far from the worldly birdlime which entangles the soul.]"

Quoting multiple lines of poetry in an essay

"Many parallels have been cited for this passage. Perhaps the closest (if Gray had read it, and the concept and phrasing are not unusual) is the one by Celio Magno (1536-1602) cited in O. Shepard and P. S. Woods, eds., English Prose and Poetry, 1660-1800 (Boston, 1934), pp. 1007-8:

Ma (qual in parte ignota
Ben ricca gemma altrui cela il suo pregio,
O fior, ch' alta virtu ha in se riposta
Visse in sen di castita nascosta,)
In sua virtute e 'n Dio contento visse,
Lunge dal visco mondan, che l' alma intrica.
[But (as in an unknown place
A very rich gem conceals its value from its neighbour,
Or a flower, which has great virtue reposed in it,
Has lived hidden in the bosom of chastity,)
He lived content in his virtue and in God
Far from the worldly birdlime which entangles the soul.]"

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